Posts made in March, 2016

Lucky Irish Pizza!

Posted by on Mar 18, 2016 in Pizza | 0 comments

Social media was blowing up yesterday with St. Patrick’s Day merriment.  Given that we had only remnants of Corned Beef and Cabbage from last weekend, I leaned into tradition-- an Irish pizza.  Yes, I did.

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Our homemade pizza dough topped with leftover horseradish cream sauce (or Dijon) spread to the edge; then, scattered with cubes of corned beef, and chopped vegetables: potato, carrot, turnip, and cabbage.  (Make certain the veggies aren’t too wet).

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I piled Taleggio cheese, a semi-soft Italian cheese with a fruity tang on the pizza, which seemed to complete the briny toppings; but any melting cheese will do.

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Halfway through, I used a spoon to carve a well in the pizza and dropped two glorious eggs into the recesses.  Bake the pizza until the eggs are set; slice a piece and drool with astonishment.

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Try it. You’ll be so wowed!

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Zoodle Me This

Posted by on Mar 16, 2016 in Salad | 0 comments

 

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Last summer, I zipped up squash noodles from our garden crooknecks using a mandoline; which I fear.

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My crook-pasta partnered with a small sum of cooked linguini and tomatoes for a simple June supper.

Flash forward to zucchini noodles trending on food magazine pages, challenging gadget manufacturers, home cooks, and appealing to healthy, gluten-free and carb-flee-diners.  MP bought an attachment to our Kitchen-aid stand mixer which enables the machine to peel and spiralize hard vegetables and some fruits into various widths and shapes.

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As of late, I lovingly stirred shoestring zucchini into soups, but blanching the renegades and getting them quickly drained for salad seemed elusive.  Food and Wine featured Kay Chun’s, Zucchini Noodle and Chicken Salad with Ginger this month.

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We were disappointed in my execution, resulting in soggy noodles; which seemed waterlogged and naked of dressing.

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On another occasion, I diligently blanched the zoodles, drained, and brilliantly spun the lengths in a salad spinner, forcing, at least, ¾ more cups of water down the drain.

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Choose evenly shaped squash, cutting into straight pieces which fit the attachment; then work in batches.

 

You’ll have waste (center and end) of the zucchini; which I donate to compost; or,

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you could make little imaginary palm trees for a crudité platter!

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Working quickly, drop squash strands into salted boiling water for 30 seconds;

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drain immediately and transfer to a water bath. No time for photographs unless you have people.

 

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As soon as the squashfetti is chilled, drop it into the basket of a salad spinner and whirl, baby.

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I wrapped the zucchini in a dish towel and stashed it in the fridge to absorb more water while I made the dressing.  The recipe calls for 6 tablespoons of canola oil of which I used 4 and 1 tablespoon of toasted sesame oil to carry the ginger theme.

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Watercress is the leafy green I used for round one with all the strands; arugula was available for my second salad when I used only half the prepared zucchini saving the rest. for another day.

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Because this was dinner, a few tidbits like MP’s pickled golden beets and onions, Pinkerton avocados, black sesame seeds plus, bright arty pickled eggs found a nest too.

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It may seem fussy; but, plan ahead, use rotisserie chicken, and other salad bits you love. Surprisingly, it’s a lot like eating gingery, fresh and well-- healthful pasta salad!

What shall I spiralize next?

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Corned Beef and Cabbage with Root Vegetables

Posted by on Mar 14, 2016 in Meat, Special Occasion | 0 comments

Photo Source: www go-today.com

Wide is the door of the little cottage.

My mom always made a big pot of Corned Beef and Cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day; and so it has for me the last 45 years.  The aroma of long-simmering salty, briny pickled brisket evokes all kinds of food memories, including March 17, 1972 when I was a pregnant shade of green.

As it is said, we all become Irish for a day, celebrating at parades with bearded trickster leprechauns, shamrocks, and hopefully; a bubbling pot of the Irish-American dish.

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My recipe evolved from potatoes and carrots to the addition of rutabagas and turnips which I adore, especially when the baby varieties spring up at the market.  Since the meat shrinks significantly, consider cooking two pieces and load up on the vegetables.  Leftover bits and pieces reign superior on their own.

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Simply place the meat and pickling spice packet

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 (I use extra spices),

peppercorns, and bay leaves in a large Dutch oven with celery stalks and a peeled onion studded with whole cloves; cover with water and bring to a boil.  Reduce to a simmer and cook the meat 50 minutes per pound.

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The meat should be fork tender but not falling apart.  Remove the celery and toss.  You may discard the onion too, but we like it.

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During the last 20-30 minutes, layer the potatoes into the pot; then the remaining veggies cut into uniform pieces.

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These turnips were such dolls; I left them whole with their cropped green hats.

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Add cabbage wedges when the vegetables are nearly done, and cook covered another 5 minutes or just until the leaves are wilted.  Remove the meat and slice across the grain.

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Load a heated platter with sliced meat and piles of grouped vegetables.  Dress them all up with chopped fresh parsley and a few ladles of aromatic broth.  Serve with English-style mustard and good sweet butter.  I go BIG, and stir a heaping spoonful of extra-hot creamed horseradish sauce (to taste) into newly whipped (unsweetened of course) heavy cream seasoned with freshly ground pepper as a foil for the corned beef.

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Irish Soda bread or cornbread with honey?;

Creamed Corn Cornbread, please!

Corned Beef and Cabbage with Root Vegetables

Ingredients

  • 6-7 pounds corned beef
  • 1 onion stuck with 8-10 cloves
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 4-5 celery ribs with leaves
  • 2 teaspoons peppercorns
  • 1-2 Tablespoons pickling spices
  • 1 ½ pounds carrots, peeled
  • 1 ½ pounds small white rose potatoes, peeled
  • 1 ½ pounds rutabagas, peeled and quartered
  • 2 bunches baby turnips
  • 2 large cabbages, wedged
  • Chopped parsley

Instructions

  1. Place corned beef, onion, bay leaves, celery ribs, peppercorns, and pickling spices in a large stockpot. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 50 minutes per pound, about 3-4 hours or until meat is tender but not falling apart. Add carrots, potatoes, rutabagas, and turnips. Cook vegetables 20-30 minutes more. Add wedged cabbage and cook 5-7 minutes more. Arrange vegetables on a platter with sliced corned beef. Garnish with chopped parsley. Serve with English style mustard and creamed horseradish sauce.
  2. Serves 8-10
  3. © Copyright 2015 Peggy Barrett Lunde
  4. All Rights Reserved
  5. http://cococooks.net/
http://cococooks.net/corned-beef-and-cabbage-with-root-vegetables/

 

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Asparagi Milanese

Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 in Breakfast and Brunch | 0 comments

Pretend you're in the Italian Countryside Sunday morning;

recover that lost hour of sleep.

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Cali winter passed us by again—but one of the first signs winter has given itself over to spring, is bright bunches of asparagus in various thicknesses at the farmers’ market; my chosen breadth is a tender medium-stalk fatty. Asparagus Milanese becomes our ample late-night dinner course.  Blanched or roasted tender-crisp asparagus is fanned on a warm plate with an olive oil fried fresh farm egg set on top.  Shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano and toasted artisan bread makes it posh and o’so luxurious.

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You’ll be heartyolken when your plate is empty.

🙂

 

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The Magic of Eggs

Posted by on Mar 9, 2016 in Salad | 1 comment

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This is a no-brainer.  If you are crazy about deviled eggs, fond of egg salad, adore warm vegetable salads of every sort, and auto-check bean-hugger, you will adore this Roasted Broccoli and White Bean Salad with Dijon-Caper DressingI have included a Real Simple Magazine link here-- and my adaptation to the recipe as I prepared it-- at the bottom of this post.

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Simply because my hiking group took up a hearty portion of the day, I messed around with preparation to fit my schedule and our tastes.

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Canned white beans, like soft cannellini, are easier, but since I had some favorite dried heirloom lima beans, I soaked them overnight and cooked this type for our salad.

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In addition, I always blanch broccoli for two minutes; then set the color and crispness in a water bath before draining and storing in the refrigerator until I roast them.

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This speeds up the roasting time to 10-12 minutes when dinnertime arrives.

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Hard-cooked farmers' market eggs with bright yolks (the basis of the dressing) as well as the dressing itself can be whipped up earlier.

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Combine the eggs, lemon juice, and Dijon in a processor and zip until smooth.

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After it was smooth, I added dill and capers; then, pulsed a couple of times.  Because MP and I like our dressings on the acidic side, I omitted the water and used all lemon juice and only 2 tablespoons olive oil.  Taste and adjust to your liking along with some salt and pepper too.

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When the broccoli is charred just so—

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coat it with some of the dressing; lay out a platter with spinach; arrange broccoli, and beans adding more dressing as you wish.  A few of MP’s pickled golden beets with onions landed on our dinner salad as well.

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A multitude of hashtag-worthy cravings like healthy, veggie, crisp, charred, creamy, eggy, briny and beautiful are fulfilled and so are you!

Roasted Broccoli and White Bean Salad with Dijon-Caper Dressing

Ingredients

  • 1 large head broccoli, trimmed and cut into large spears
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • kosher salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 Tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs
  • 3 Tablespoons drained capers, chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped dill, plus more for garnish
  • 1 (15-oz.) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • 3-4 ounces baby spinach, stemmed

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  2. Combine the broccoli, 2 tablespoons of the oil, and the salt on the prepared sheet and toss to evenly coat. Roast until golden and tender, stirring halfway through, about 20 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the lemon juice, mustard, and eggs in a food processor and pulse to combine. With the machine on, slowly drizzle in the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil until the dressing is smooth. Stir in the capers and dill. Scrape half of the dressing into a large bowl. Add the warm broccoli, beans, and spinach and toss to coat. Transfer to a serving platter and serve warm, sprinkled with more dill. Serve the remaining dressing on the side.
  4. --adapted from Real Simple by Kay Chun
http://cococooks.net/the-magic-of-eggs/

 

 

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